High satisfaction with Health Workplace: survey

Healthy Workplace co-ordinator Cindy Robinson is pleased with survey results that show a high satisfaction with the committee’s activities. (Chris King Photo)
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Whether they work in a classroom or an office, faculty and staff have had their say on the impact of the Healthy Workplace initiative and it turns out that they like it – they really like it.

“The overall satisfaction was huge, so we were ecstatic when we saw the results come in,” says Ed Kane, assistant vice-president of University Services, who chairs the Healthy Workplace Committee.

Each year, faculty and staff members are surveyed by email on their satisfaction of different services offered around campus. This year was the first time that healthy workplace activities were added onto the survey.

“We’re consistently looking for feedback from the university community at large,” adds Cindy Robinson, Healthy Workplace Committee co-ordinator.

The survey results showed that more than 75 per cent of the 199 respondents were “very satisfied” with the programs offered through Healthy Workplace.

The most popular programs were lunchtime yoga classes, workshops focussed around nutrition and how to care of an aging parent, as well as a presentation from Carleton’s own Linda Duxbury on work-life balance, and fitness consultations.

Kane says the number of people participating in these events was phenomenal – especially for the Healthy Workplace’s first year, which saw more than 2,000 participants come out to the various events.

While there was high general satisfaction, the survey was also valuable in highlighting areas where more work can be done.

One of those areas is engaging faculty. The survey results shows that overall participation numbers were lower among faculty members but Robinson says that is because they tend to have different schedules than staff. That’s why, she adds, the committee will organize events at different times of the day, hoping that the approach appeals to faculty members.

Another area where there’s room for improvement is with supervisors and managers. Going forward, Robinson says that there will be an effort specifically engage supervisors and managers in an effort to show the important role they play in creating and encouraging a healthy workplace.

As well, Kane says he’d like to see Healthy Workplace do more in the areas of mental health, work-life balance and stress.

The survey will be done again in two years, and Kane hopes to see more participation from faculty and high scores for all the services Healthy Workplace provides.

Despite the small kinks, Kane and Robinson say that the high numbers and popular events are evidence that Healthy Workplace had a successful first year.

For Robinson, the survey results were proof that Healthy Workplace is having a real impact on employees.

“They’re feeling more satisfied and motivated that healthy workplace is providing that sense of community,” she says. “What’s really encouraging is after one year we’re meeting our goals and we have a great framework to work from. We need to continue to offer the successful programs so we can enhance the workplace here at Carleton.”

http://www2.carleton.ca/healthy-workplace/

This entry was written by Kristy Strauss and posted in the issue. Tags applied to this article are: , , . Leave a comment, bookmark the permalink or share the following short URL for this article via social media: http://carletonnow.carleton.ca/?p=5158

Kristy Strauss

By Kristy Strauss

Kristy Strauss graduated from Carleton's journalism program in 2009. She is a regular contributor to Carleton Now. She has worked as a reporter for the Kemptville Advance. She currently reports for EMC Ottawa South.

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