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Viewpoint

Pursuing a BA? It makes perfect sense

Because neither of my parents pursued post-secondary education, there was a lot of pressure on me to not only do well in school, but to pick a major that guaranteed financial success. You can imagine my mother’s face when I told her I wanted to Continue 

Viewpoint

Bigger maps: Why the humanities still matter

When the Japanese government ordered its 86 national universities to take “active steps to abolish [social science and humanities] organizations or to convert them to serve areas that better meet society’s needs” last June, some of Continue 

Viewpoint

National Engineering Month: Let’s celebrate our women engineers

Today’s engineering profession needs a diverse set of skilled people to solve problems and advance society in many areas, from infrastructure and health to Continue 

A New You, One Step at a Time

The new year is not an ideal time to start a new exercise routine in Canada. It’s often cold and dark and quite possibly slushy or icy outside, which is not a problem for people who are comfortable wearing layers and knobby footwear but can be a Continue 

Viewpoint

Terrorism: After Paris, Beirut, San Bernardino and Too Many Other Places

As I write, I am about to deliver my final class in the terrorism and international security course for the term. There are different ways to approach this Continue 

Viewpoint

Peaceful Weapons: The Power of the Arts

The recent federal election campaign was fought around a number of issues. These included everything from the middle class, refugees, corporate tax rates and national security to the economy, greenhouse gases, marijuana and the clothing choices of Continue 

Viewpoint

Beyond Numbers: The Role of Universities in Responding to the Syrian Refugee Crisis

Something profound happened on the morning of Sept. 2, 2015. We had known about the scale of the crisis facing Syrian refugees for well over a year. Continue 

Viewpoint

Carleton Catching Students When they Fall with FITA Program

Life is what happens when you were planning something else and there are times when life becomes very hard to manage for university students. At Carleton, we support students whose lives seem to be going sideways with a program called From Continue 

Viewpoint

It’s Google’s Universe and We’re Just Visiting

In 1999, the year after Google was launched, former Sun Microsystems chief executive Scott McNealy glibly said: “You have zero privacy … Get over it.” By then, Google had cached about 25 million web pages, but hadn’t yet started Gmail and Continue 

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Screaming All the Way Down: The Great Heights Paradox – A Grad’s Blog

When I was a kid, there were a few activities that I relished more than anything else: getting gold stars, correcting my classmates’ spelling and Continue 

Viewpoint

What is Post-Secondary Education For? To Build a Better World, says C2UExpo 2015

By Ted Jackson and Geri Briggs What are universities and colleges for? At the end of this month, hundreds of professors, non-profit leaders, Continue 

Viewpoint

Political parties and media can play a key role in increasing women’s political representation

It is time that political parties stepped to the plate to advance women’s representation in political offices across this country. Although Continue 

Viewpoint

Grassroots Leadership

In many respects, the core functions of our universities remain the same as they have for centuries – the preservation, development and transfer of knowledge. Yet society is expecting more and more of universities and their leaders.  Signs point to  increasing expectations  and the Continue 

Viewpoint

Art galleries becoming “third spaces”

What did you do during your last visit to an art gallery? Perhaps that’s a silly question; your answer must be “I looked at art,” right? Not necessarily, or at least, not completely. Today, the relationship between cultural institutions and Continue 

Viewpoint

Making the case for the Power of the Arts

By Jean-Daniel Lafond and John Osborne The recent tragic murders of members of the Canadian Forces in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu and in Ottawa serve as sad reminders that our society is not entirely “whole,” in the sense of being entirely Continue 

Viewpoint

New academic year offers “enriching and rewarding” opportunities: Provost

Once again, it is time to welcome everyone to the start of another new academic year. In particular, I want to extend a warm welcome to all of our new Continue 

Viewpoint

Research suggests some First Nations need more flexibility

Let’s say that you are the chief of one of the 617 First Nation communities across Canada. Let’s also say that the band leadership in your community has been stable for many years; you meet your obligations to the federal government for Continue 

Viewpoint

Kwibuka 20: The crying that I will never forget

I spent the day with thousands of others who jammed Kigali’s soccer stadium to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi. It was only minutes into the ceremony when the screaming began. At first, it was just one Continue 

Viewpoint

Writing on the wall in closing of federal libraries

On March 29, 2012, the federal government introduced a new budget that outlined plans to cut $5.2 billion in departmental spending over three years. At the time, the media coverage was mostly about the expected loss of public service jobs, more Continue 

Viewpoint

Do your political opinions affect how far away you think Vancouver is?

How well do we know the countries we call home? It seems obvious that travel and study would improve a person’s knowledge of geography. But could attitudes Continue 

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Creating Carleton’s Living Lab

If you happen to be wandering around the Human Computer Interaction Building on Carleton’s campus these days, you will have noticed a fair amount of activity on the 4th and 5th floors. This is Carleton University’s 7,500 sq.ft. Living Continue 

Viewpoint

Senate of Canada v. Supreme Court of Canada

Since taking office in 2006, the Harper government has repeatedly introduced (though not seriously advanced) legislation that, if passed and if constitutional, would: (1) reduce the term of senators from age 75 to a nine year, non-renewable term; Continue 

Viewpoint

Grad using degree in real-world way

“I can’t believe I just did that,” I mumbled to myself. I had just been yelled at by an irate Ghanaian security guard, after I handed something to him using my left hand. It was a cultural no-no, and something I had read about so many times Continue 

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Impact investing and responsible investing: what does it mean?

We hear a lot about impact investing these days, but what is it and how does it relate to responsible investing? As we know, responsible investing takes Continue 

Viewpoint

The Changing Face of Carleton University Campus

I first came to Carleton University in 2005, as a Writer-in-Residence. The most remarkable architectural presence on campus was, for me then, Dunton Tower (DT), which houses the English Department, my host. My office was on the 18th floor, at an Continue 

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Food Security in Canada: Toward a National Food Policy for All

Want Amid Plenty Here’s a conundrum: Producers in the Canadian agri-food system are supplying more food than ever before to international markets, but a Continue 

Viewpoint

Each Verse a Universe

Ted Jackson, a faculty member in the School of Public Policy and Administration, was among a group of people asked to write about their memories of Jack Layton. These memories are compiled in a book called Love, Hope and Optimism: An informal portrait of Jack Layton by those who knew him Continue 

Viewpoint

Summer in Sierra Leone an adventure made possible through internship

I remember exactly how I felt as I boarded the plane to Freetown, Sierra Leone. Excited as I was, I just knew something would go wrong – they would forget to Continue 

Viewpoint

Stop being shocked by Facebook … let’s shift the conversation

For many of us who routinely use the Internet, our lives extend into online social spaces. A handful of social media platforms play a major role in daily Continue 

Viewpoint

Women in Management -The More Things Change . . .

The more things change, the more they stay the same? Not quite. Women have made significant gains in management over the past 20 years. Unfortunately, equality is still a long way off. When Carleton University’s Centre for Research and Education Continue 

Viewpoint

Twitter in the Court

By Mary McGuire and Susan Harada Whether reporters should be tweeting from courtrooms is not something the creators of Twitter could have imagined would be debated in Canadian journalistic and legal circles when they gave birth to their new social network six years ago; nevertheless, Twitter Continue 

Viewpoint

Twitter in the Tower

My university’s PR department recently invited me to talk about the benefits and limitations of using Twitter in support of research and teaching. As a communications professor who is trained as a sociologist, I spend a lot of time playing with digital media, experimenting with and Continue 

Viewpoint

Mobile devices: How secure are they?

Do you know what your smartphone is doing right now? Your favourite app may be sending email addresses from your contact list to spammers. It may be tracking your location and sending this information without your knowledge. Unfortunately, it is Continue 

Viewpoint

Linda Duxbury weighs in on what ails OC Transpo

Carleton Now: What do you think the root problem is at OC Transpo? Linda Duxbury: This is not a recent problem. Don’t forget that we had a shooting there (1999) It’s not like all of a sudden we’ve got an issue here. This seems to be a work Continue 

Viewpoint

The process is the point: the Occupy movement in Canada

Since the Occupy movement arrived in Canada, pundits and media commentators have been scratching their heads, asking the same question in different ways: what is the point? Critics of the nascent movement highlight a lack of coherent goals, the Continue 

Viewpoint

One Ontario Voter: Lost and Found

So, this Thursday is Ontario Election Day. Or more precisely, it’s the last day you can vote before the ballots are counted. So why is the political scientist in me not more excited? I should be planning my election night rituals – thinking Continue 

Viewpoint

Ten Years after 9/11: Where are we and where do we go?

Ten years after the World Trade Centre attacks awoke fortress North America from its naïve impression of being beyond the reach of international terrorism, are we any safer? If “safer” means that some asset protection and security (AP&S) Continue 

Viewpoint

Rethinking the think-tank

Like our colleagues at many think-tanks across the country, the Centre for Trade Policy and Law (CTPL) is grappling with questions of constituency, relevance and funding in an era of government fiscal restraint and changing public expectations about what governments can and should do. To Continue 

Viewpoint

NDP makes prime time

So far, post-election media coverage has focused on domestic politics and internal party issues as the New Democratic Party assumes its parliamentary role as Canada’s official Opposition. Fair enough. What positions the party will take on health care and pensions, how leader Jack Continue 

Viewpoint

A behind the scenes look at Conversation Pieces: African Textiles from Barbara and Bill McCann’s Collection

In late 2008, I received an email from Barbara McCann, pitching an exhibition to Carleton University Art Gallery (CUAG) of African textiles drawn Continue 

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